DO NOT TRAVEL VIA TAQSA BUS
            This is a strong recommendation to avoid, at all costs, taking TAQSA buses.  The reason we chose to ride with them was they provided the only non-stop bus from El Chaltén to Bariloche.  Traveling with TAQSA, however, will save you absolutely no time.
            It should have been evident things were going to go wrong when our 3:50am bus was delayed an hour and half due to “technical difficulties”.  We had only driven about 4 hours when all of a sudden the bus started jerking and then was slowly pulled over to the side of the road, in the middle of nowhere within the vast nothingness of the Pampa.  It was dead. 
            It’s one thing for a company to have something knowingly go wrong.  I mean they did choose to put us on a bad bus.  It was made worse, however, when they had us sitting on that dead bus for hours without telling us what the hell was going on.  The only reason they finally shared information was because some of the passengers demanded answers. 
            We waited on the side of the road 10 hours before a manager, and so-called-mechanic, arrived from El Calafate.  Luckily, they did serve us our included breakfast/lunch meals during this time.  The manager was unable to fix what the drivers had been unable to fix, but was no better at telling us what he planned for us to do.  Finally, at dusk, we were informed, by one of the passengers (of course), that they were transferring us via shuttle to the nearby town of Gregorios.  There, they paid for us to have a mediocre dinner at a restaurant, whose owners informed us, was used on a frequent basis by the company when their buses die.  We waited there until 5:30 am without any word from the company about what they were planning to do with us.  Finally, an irritated Chilean musician went to the company’s offices.  There, he found a new bus had arrived from El Calafate but that they were still trying to repair the bad bus for our transport.  He came and informed all the half-awake passengers.  This information aroused our senses and had us up in arms and eager to get going.  We all gathered our things and headed to the offices together, where we demanded they put us on the new bus.  They listened and we were finally on our way.
            So, the moral of the story is, do NOT NOT NOT take TAQSA bus in Argentina. DO NOT TRAVEL VIA TAQSA BUS
            This is a strong recommendation to avoid, at all costs, taking TAQSA buses.  The reason we chose to ride with them was they provided the only non-stop bus from El Chaltén to Bariloche.  Traveling with TAQSA, however, will save you absolutely no time.
            It should have been evident things were going to go wrong when our 3:50am bus was delayed an hour and half due to “technical difficulties”.  We had only driven about 4 hours when all of a sudden the bus started jerking and then was slowly pulled over to the side of the road, in the middle of nowhere within the vast nothingness of the Pampa.  It was dead. 
            It’s one thing for a company to have something knowingly go wrong.  I mean they did choose to put us on a bad bus.  It was made worse, however, when they had us sitting on that dead bus for hours without telling us what the hell was going on.  The only reason they finally shared information was because some of the passengers demanded answers. 
            We waited on the side of the road 10 hours before a manager, and so-called-mechanic, arrived from El Calafate.  Luckily, they did serve us our included breakfast/lunch meals during this time.  The manager was unable to fix what the drivers had been unable to fix, but was no better at telling us what he planned for us to do.  Finally, at dusk, we were informed, by one of the passengers (of course), that they were transferring us via shuttle to the nearby town of Gregorios.  There, they paid for us to have a mediocre dinner at a restaurant, whose owners informed us, was used on a frequent basis by the company when their buses die.  We waited there until 5:30 am without any word from the company about what they were planning to do with us.  Finally, an irritated Chilean musician went to the company’s offices.  There, he found a new bus had arrived from El Calafate but that they were still trying to repair the bad bus for our transport.  He came and informed all the half-awake passengers.  This information aroused our senses and had us up in arms and eager to get going.  We all gathered our things and headed to the offices together, where we demanded they put us on the new bus.  They listened and we were finally on our way.
            So, the moral of the story is, do NOT NOT NOT take TAQSA bus in Argentina. DO NOT TRAVEL VIA TAQSA BUS
            This is a strong recommendation to avoid, at all costs, taking TAQSA buses.  The reason we chose to ride with them was they provided the only non-stop bus from El Chaltén to Bariloche.  Traveling with TAQSA, however, will save you absolutely no time.
            It should have been evident things were going to go wrong when our 3:50am bus was delayed an hour and half due to “technical difficulties”.  We had only driven about 4 hours when all of a sudden the bus started jerking and then was slowly pulled over to the side of the road, in the middle of nowhere within the vast nothingness of the Pampa.  It was dead. 
            It’s one thing for a company to have something knowingly go wrong.  I mean they did choose to put us on a bad bus.  It was made worse, however, when they had us sitting on that dead bus for hours without telling us what the hell was going on.  The only reason they finally shared information was because some of the passengers demanded answers. 
            We waited on the side of the road 10 hours before a manager, and so-called-mechanic, arrived from El Calafate.  Luckily, they did serve us our included breakfast/lunch meals during this time.  The manager was unable to fix what the drivers had been unable to fix, but was no better at telling us what he planned for us to do.  Finally, at dusk, we were informed, by one of the passengers (of course), that they were transferring us via shuttle to the nearby town of Gregorios.  There, they paid for us to have a mediocre dinner at a restaurant, whose owners informed us, was used on a frequent basis by the company when their buses die.  We waited there until 5:30 am without any word from the company about what they were planning to do with us.  Finally, an irritated Chilean musician went to the company’s offices.  There, he found a new bus had arrived from El Calafate but that they were still trying to repair the bad bus for our transport.  He came and informed all the half-awake passengers.  This information aroused our senses and had us up in arms and eager to get going.  We all gathered our things and headed to the offices together, where we demanded they put us on the new bus.  They listened and we were finally on our way.
            So, the moral of the story is, do NOT NOT NOT take TAQSA bus in Argentina. DO NOT TRAVEL VIA TAQSA BUS
            This is a strong recommendation to avoid, at all costs, taking TAQSA buses.  The reason we chose to ride with them was they provided the only non-stop bus from El Chaltén to Bariloche.  Traveling with TAQSA, however, will save you absolutely no time.
            It should have been evident things were going to go wrong when our 3:50am bus was delayed an hour and half due to “technical difficulties”.  We had only driven about 4 hours when all of a sudden the bus started jerking and then was slowly pulled over to the side of the road, in the middle of nowhere within the vast nothingness of the Pampa.  It was dead. 
            It’s one thing for a company to have something knowingly go wrong.  I mean they did choose to put us on a bad bus.  It was made worse, however, when they had us sitting on that dead bus for hours without telling us what the hell was going on.  The only reason they finally shared information was because some of the passengers demanded answers. 
            We waited on the side of the road 10 hours before a manager, and so-called-mechanic, arrived from El Calafate.  Luckily, they did serve us our included breakfast/lunch meals during this time.  The manager was unable to fix what the drivers had been unable to fix, but was no better at telling us what he planned for us to do.  Finally, at dusk, we were informed, by one of the passengers (of course), that they were transferring us via shuttle to the nearby town of Gregorios.  There, they paid for us to have a mediocre dinner at a restaurant, whose owners informed us, was used on a frequent basis by the company when their buses die.  We waited there until 5:30 am without any word from the company about what they were planning to do with us.  Finally, an irritated Chilean musician went to the company’s offices.  There, he found a new bus had arrived from El Calafate but that they were still trying to repair the bad bus for our transport.  He came and informed all the half-awake passengers.  This information aroused our senses and had us up in arms and eager to get going.  We all gathered our things and headed to the offices together, where we demanded they put us on the new bus.  They listened and we were finally on our way.
            So, the moral of the story is, do NOT NOT NOT take TAQSA bus in Argentina. DO NOT TRAVEL VIA TAQSA BUS
            This is a strong recommendation to avoid, at all costs, taking TAQSA buses.  The reason we chose to ride with them was they provided the only non-stop bus from El Chaltén to Bariloche.  Traveling with TAQSA, however, will save you absolutely no time.
            It should have been evident things were going to go wrong when our 3:50am bus was delayed an hour and half due to “technical difficulties”.  We had only driven about 4 hours when all of a sudden the bus started jerking and then was slowly pulled over to the side of the road, in the middle of nowhere within the vast nothingness of the Pampa.  It was dead. 
            It’s one thing for a company to have something knowingly go wrong.  I mean they did choose to put us on a bad bus.  It was made worse, however, when they had us sitting on that dead bus for hours without telling us what the hell was going on.  The only reason they finally shared information was because some of the passengers demanded answers. 
            We waited on the side of the road 10 hours before a manager, and so-called-mechanic, arrived from El Calafate.  Luckily, they did serve us our included breakfast/lunch meals during this time.  The manager was unable to fix what the drivers had been unable to fix, but was no better at telling us what he planned for us to do.  Finally, at dusk, we were informed, by one of the passengers (of course), that they were transferring us via shuttle to the nearby town of Gregorios.  There, they paid for us to have a mediocre dinner at a restaurant, whose owners informed us, was used on a frequent basis by the company when their buses die.  We waited there until 5:30 am without any word from the company about what they were planning to do with us.  Finally, an irritated Chilean musician went to the company’s offices.  There, he found a new bus had arrived from El Calafate but that they were still trying to repair the bad bus for our transport.  He came and informed all the half-awake passengers.  This information aroused our senses and had us up in arms and eager to get going.  We all gathered our things and headed to the offices together, where we demanded they put us on the new bus.  They listened and we were finally on our way.
            So, the moral of the story is, do NOT NOT NOT take TAQSA bus in Argentina. DO NOT TRAVEL VIA TAQSA BUS
            This is a strong recommendation to avoid, at all costs, taking TAQSA buses.  The reason we chose to ride with them was they provided the only non-stop bus from El Chaltén to Bariloche.  Traveling with TAQSA, however, will save you absolutely no time.
            It should have been evident things were going to go wrong when our 3:50am bus was delayed an hour and half due to “technical difficulties”.  We had only driven about 4 hours when all of a sudden the bus started jerking and then was slowly pulled over to the side of the road, in the middle of nowhere within the vast nothingness of the Pampa.  It was dead. 
            It’s one thing for a company to have something knowingly go wrong.  I mean they did choose to put us on a bad bus.  It was made worse, however, when they had us sitting on that dead bus for hours without telling us what the hell was going on.  The only reason they finally shared information was because some of the passengers demanded answers. 
            We waited on the side of the road 10 hours before a manager, and so-called-mechanic, arrived from El Calafate.  Luckily, they did serve us our included breakfast/lunch meals during this time.  The manager was unable to fix what the drivers had been unable to fix, but was no better at telling us what he planned for us to do.  Finally, at dusk, we were informed, by one of the passengers (of course), that they were transferring us via shuttle to the nearby town of Gregorios.  There, they paid for us to have a mediocre dinner at a restaurant, whose owners informed us, was used on a frequent basis by the company when their buses die.  We waited there until 5:30 am without any word from the company about what they were planning to do with us.  Finally, an irritated Chilean musician went to the company’s offices.  There, he found a new bus had arrived from El Calafate but that they were still trying to repair the bad bus for our transport.  He came and informed all the half-awake passengers.  This information aroused our senses and had us up in arms and eager to get going.  We all gathered our things and headed to the offices together, where we demanded they put us on the new bus.  They listened and we were finally on our way.
            So, the moral of the story is, do NOT NOT NOT take TAQSA bus in Argentina.

DO NOT TRAVEL VIA TAQSA BUS

            This is a strong recommendation to avoid, at all costs, taking TAQSA buses.  The reason we chose to ride with them was they provided the only non-stop bus from El Chaltén to Bariloche.  Traveling with TAQSA, however, will save you absolutely no time.

            It should have been evident things were going to go wrong when our 3:50am bus was delayed an hour and half due to “technical difficulties”.  We had only driven about 4 hours when all of a sudden the bus started jerking and then was slowly pulled over to the side of the road, in the middle of nowhere within the vast nothingness of the Pampa.  It was dead. 

            It’s one thing for a company to have something knowingly go wrong.  I mean they did choose to put us on a bad bus.  It was made worse, however, when they had us sitting on that dead bus for hours without telling us what the hell was going on.  The only reason they finally shared information was because some of the passengers demanded answers. 

            We waited on the side of the road 10 hours before a manager, and so-called-mechanic, arrived from El Calafate.  Luckily, they did serve us our included breakfast/lunch meals during this time.  The manager was unable to fix what the drivers had been unable to fix, but was no better at telling us what he planned for us to do.  Finally, at dusk, we were informed, by one of the passengers (of course), that they were transferring us via shuttle to the nearby town of Gregorios.  There, they paid for us to have a mediocre dinner at a restaurant, whose owners informed us, was used on a frequent basis by the company when their buses die.  We waited there until 5:30 am without any word from the company about what they were planning to do with us.  Finally, an irritated Chilean musician went to the company’s offices.  There, he found a new bus had arrived from El Calafate but that they were still trying to repair the bad bus for our transport.  He came and informed all the half-awake passengers.  This information aroused our senses and had us up in arms and eager to get going.  We all gathered our things and headed to the offices together, where we demanded they put us on the new bus.  They listened and we were finally on our way.

            So, the moral of the story is, do NOT NOT NOT take TAQSA bus in Argentina.